Ancient Antibiotic Antidote


Despite the absolutely mind-blowing scientific developments we have witnessed in the last few decades, it seems like our ancestors still have the upper hand, as a 1000-year-old recipe for a treatment is effective against our worst medical nightmare: superbugs.

Bald’s Leechbook

If you can read Old English, this page from the Bald’s Leechbook will give you the recipe to fight the almighty MRSA

The instructions for said cure, found in the “Bald’s Leechbook” manuscript (written in the 9th Century), called for mixing garlic, leeks, wine, and bile from a cow’s stomach in a brass container, so that’s what scientists in Nottingham University, curious about the effectiveness of this old-fashioned procedure, prepared. There was one slight exception: brass containers are costly and difficult to keep bacteria-free, so instead they used a glass bottle and inserted brass sheets into the mixture hoping it would have the same effect. It was left for nine days to sit, producing a dominant garlic scent which filled the lab. But proof did eventually start to show that demonstrated this was more than child’s play: the bacteria that had been added through the soil in the garlic and the leek had been killed, meaning the solution was actually sterilising itself.

Originally, the concoction was thought out to treat styes (eyelash infections) which are caused by Staphylococcus aureus bacteria, supposedly working perfectly fine. But the reconstruction has now been tested on Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus; the older, tougher sibling of the original bacteria and the mixture can still hold its ground. In an experiment using pieces of skin from infected mice, the centuries-old mixture cleared 90% of the MRSA infection; just as much as the standard modern antibiotic used for this type of bacteria.

What’s interesting to note is that only the mixture of all these compounds actually caused an effect on the bacteria. The scientists conducting this research carried out several repeats, each time changing the variables by using only one of the ingredients in a brass-containing water solution. By themselves, they were useless against MRSA, which was to expect because even though they all have some antimicrobial properties, this type of superbug is one of the hardest to kill. But when they were brewed together, they were able to almost completely massacre the culture. Although an explanation for why only their combined effects works is still missing, the frenzy of this wild event has caught many scientists from all around the world’s attention, and many experiments are currently being conducted in hopes of finding out the mechanism behind this ‘magical’ preparation.

This event just goes to show that although we may see most past scientists as delirious people who though the Earth was flat and there were only 5 elements, they still had some very promising ideas which should be remembered.

A great video on the matter you should watch if you’re interested is:

(Special thanks to reader pcawdron for sharing it)

Antibiotic Hero


Antibiotics are the real wonder drug. They were a revolution in the 20th century, capable of fighting the most powerful bacterial infections. Scientists understood their potential and worked tirelessly to create a wide variety of them to harness their power, but eventually they stopped. Since the 1980s, no new antibiotic has been discovered. Since we have a great amount of them, it wouldn’t be too big of an issue, if it weren’t for a growing problem: resistance.

Due to the threat antibiotics represent to bacteria, these organisms feel a high selection pressure to evolve and develop new ways to defend themselves from these drugs. And they have succeeded. Many strains of bacteria, especially for diseases like MRSA and TB, have become immune to many antibiotics and are proving really hard to fight. Due to the increase in antibiotic resistance, there has been a hunt for new antibiotics in the recent years, and it has finally paid off.

The most common way to obtain an antibiotic is from bacteria themselves. We are not the only ones who want to get rid of them; competing bacteria do too. So when these bacteria develop chemicals to destroy other bacteria, we need to extract them and use them to our advantage. But to extract the chemicals, bacteria need to be cultured in the lab, which can be difficult at time, since the most used bacteria for this process are found in the soil, which has conditions difficult to recreate in the lab. A new method created by researchers in Boston could solve this: it consists of creating a culture with three layers: two layers of soil on either side of a semi permeable membrane. These are perfect conditions for bacteria and have made it possible for thousands of them to grow and for a possible new antibiotic to be isolated.

teixobactin

Teixobactin could fight TB and other diseases which, over the years, have become immune to our medications

 It’s called teixobactin, and it targets proteins on the membrane of bacteria, eventually killing them. Because of its complicated mechanism, it is very hard for bacteria to develop resistance to its action. However, it is not impossible. Scientists predict that if used correctly (that is, without overprescribing), teixobactin could be effective for over 30 years, quite a long lifespan for an antibiotic. As it is completely new and bacteria have never been exposed to it, many say it could be the key to fight multidrug resistant bacteria, fighting superbugs and giving us and edge over the most fierce and dangerous infections. These hopeful results have yet to be confirmed in human trials, but the effectiveness of the new antibiotic seems to be as good as it sounds in animal tests.

 With this new method and this new antibiotic, the future of medicine could prosper, and bacterial infection could remain an enemy we can defeat.